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new-aesthetic:

Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied on a Whole City - Conor Friedersdorf - The Atlantic

In a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department sent a civilian aircraft* over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality. 

Compton residents weren’t told about the spying, which happened in 2012. “We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people,” Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he’s trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren’t watching in real time. 

If it’s adopted, Americans can be policed like Iraqis and Afghanis under occupation–and at bargain prices. 

Persistence Surveillance Systems is the company behind the technology, as previously featured on One Visible Future.

new-aesthetic:

Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied on a Whole City - Conor Friedersdorf - The Atlantic

In a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department sent a civilian aircraft* over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality. Compton residents weren’t told about the spying, which happened in 2012. “We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people,” Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he’s trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren’t watching in real time. If it’s adopted, Americans can be policed like Iraqis and Afghanis under occupation–and at bargain prices.
Persistence Surveillance Systems is the company behind the technology, as previously featured on One Visible Future.
amy-ambrosio:

Ming Xi and Jared Leto after Jeremy Scott F/W 2014.

amy-ambrosio:

Ming Xi and Jared Leto after Jeremy Scott F/W 2014.

wmagazine:

Sofia Coppola and Marc Jacobs pal out. 
Photograph by Robert Rich. 

wmagazine:

Sofia Coppola and Marc Jacobs pal out. 

Photograph by Robert Rich. 

"Gazing at the rain, I consider what it means to belong, to become part of something. To have someone cry for me."
Haruki Murakami (via blackestdespondency)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

rogwalker:

Had a great time hosting Jesse Boykins III at the loft yesterday. Be sure to check out his new album.

vouzou:

The Hubble Extreme Deep Field
The Hubble Extreme Deep Field is the most distant image of the Universe ever created. Its diameter is one tenth the width of the full moon, its area is one 30 millionth of the entire sky. Within this field of view there are more than 5000 galaxies, 600 trillion stars and 50 quadrillion planets and moons. The light from the most distant visible objects was created more than 13 billion years ago, when the Universe was only 5% of it’s current age. This photograph is a slice of infinity, proof of the immense scale of reality.

vouzou:

The Hubble Extreme Deep Field

The Hubble Extreme Deep Field is the most distant image of the Universe ever created. Its diameter is one tenth the width of the full moon, its area is one 30 millionth of the entire sky. Within this field of view there are more than 5000 galaxies, 600 trillion stars and 50 quadrillion planets and moons. The light from the most distant visible objects was created more than 13 billion years ago, when the Universe was only 5% of it’s current age. This photograph is a slice of infinity, proof of the immense scale of reality.

(via likeafieldmouse)

wmagazine:

Makeup artist Dick Page gives Sofia Coppola a lesson

Photographs by Dick Page and Jason Gibbs; W magazine May 2014. 

efedra:

Entropy (Melilla, Spain - Morocco) by Escif

efedra:

Entropy (Melilla, Spain - Morocco) by Escif

"I don’t think love is always a huge, cataclysmal emotional event. I think sometimes it sits in front of you for a very long time until you glance over and say, oh, there you are. I don’t think it’s your saving grace. I think it’s the hand that you hold while you save yourself. I don’t think it’s someone who sweeps you off your feet. I think it’s someone who stays right beside you and lets you walk on your own. I don’t think it’s always a blazing but temporary insanity of racing hearts and hormones. I think that’s the love that changes us. The love that should stay with us is the calm, deep, thorough knowing that you want to be with someone despite logical objections. And what may be even more important than anything is that I think you find your own love at the very edges of where other people’s love pushes you."
(via theperksofbeingtiffany)

(via fuckyeahexistentialism)

leopoldasbeach:

JOSH REIM F/W 2014 COLLECTION IS SO AMAZING I WANT EVERYTHING

"

There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting. Consider this utterly commonplace situation: a man is walking down the street. At a certain moment, he tries to recall something, but the recollection escapes him. Automatically he slows down. Meanwhile, a person who wants to forget a disagreeable
incident he has just lived through starts unconsciously to speed up his pace, as if he were trying to distance himself from a thing still too close to him in time.

In existential mathematics, that experience takes the form of two basic equations: the degree of slowness is directly proportion to the intensity of memory; the degree of speed is directly proportional to the intensity of forgetting.

"
Milan Kundera, from Slowness (HarperCollins, 1996)

(Source: liquidnight, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

new-aesthetic:

Chilling App Reveals Security Cameras All Around You | Co.Design

Watch Your Privacy renders bulls eye-like hot spots on the ground where cameras could be filming, and it extends field-of-view cones from cameras themselves. This user interface does not blend in with subtlety. Cameras flood your view with red, yellow, and green iconography, and the relatively covert world of public surveillance is made wonderfully overt.

If it feels ironic that Google Glass—another camera aimed at the world around you—is the platform for Watch Your Privacy, know that the irony isn’t completely lost on Veenhof. When using the app, Glass users automatically upload their own GPS coordinates. This tags every other Watch Your Privacy user in your field of view, but tags you, as a fellow Google Glass/camera wearer, in the process.

new-aesthetic:

Chilling App Reveals Security Cameras All Around You | Co.Design

Watch Your Privacy renders bulls eye-like hot spots on the ground where cameras could be filming, and it extends field-of-view cones from cameras themselves. This user interface does not blend in with subtlety. Cameras flood your view with red, yellow, and green iconography, and the relatively covert world of public surveillance is made wonderfully overt. If it feels ironic that Google Glass—another camera aimed at the world around you—is the platform for Watch Your Privacy, know that the irony isn’t completely lost on Veenhof. When using the app, Glass users automatically upload their own GPS coordinates. This tags every other Watch Your Privacy user in your field of view, but tags you, as a fellow Google Glass/camera wearer, in the process.
for future reference (shoes from The Darjeeling Limited)

for future reference (shoes from The Darjeeling Limited)